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Travel Destination In Bhutan
Travel Destination In Bhutan

01. Thimphu

Raised in the mountains to commend the 60th commemoration of the fourth Bhutanese ruler, Jigme Singye Wangchuck, the Buddha Dordenma Statue is one of the biggest Buddha rupas on the planet, and stands 52 meters tall, with more than 125,000 little sculptures of the Buddha inside. Made as the sitting figure of Sakyamuni Buddha, the undertaking cost more than 100 million US dollars to finish. Around the Buddha sculpture lies the Kuensel Phodrang Nature Park, 943 sections of land of forested zones that were opened in 2011 to permit guests to the site to unwind in a calm and tranquil environment. Curiously, the structure of the sculpture was prognosticated by Padmasambhava himself in an old terma that goes back to the eighth century, which was rehashed by the yogi Sonam Zangpo in the mid-twentieth century.

                                   

02. Buddha Dordenma Statue

Raised in the mountains to praise the 60th commemoration of the fourth Bhutanese lord, Jigme Singye Wangchuck, the Buddha Dordenma Statue is one of the biggest Buddha rupas on the planet, and stands 52 meters tall, with more than 125,000 little sculptures of the Buddha inside. Made as the sitting figure of Sakyamuni Buddha, the undertaking cost more than 100 million US dollars to finish. Around the Buddha sculpture lies the Kuensel Phodrang Nature Park, 943 sections of land of forested territories that were opened in 2011 to permit guests to the site to unwind in a tranquil and serene climate. Curiously, the structure of the sculpture was anticipated by Padmasambhava himself in an old terma that goes back to the eighth century, which was rehashed by the yogi Sonam Zangpo in the mid-twentieth century.

                                     

03. Paro

Set in the awesome Paro Valley, the second city of Bhutan is the primary spot you will see when you enter the nation since it is the place where the main worldwide air terminal is arranged. Lying close by the Paro River, the site has been the area of a cloister of some sort since the tenth century and was the northern fortification of Bhutan against intrusion from Tibet. The central avenue of the city is loaded up with a rich and complex design, with customary Bhutanese houses and shops competing for space with bistros and cafés. Paro is likewise a decent spot for extraordinary collectibles and Buddhist gifts, just as numerous petition-related ancient rarities, in spite of the fact that collectibles can’t be removed from the realm.

                             

04. Taktsang Monastery

Sitting in excess of 800 meters over the Paro Valley, roosted on an edge most of the way up the precipice face of the mountain, sits the marvelous Taktsang or “Tiger’s Nest” cloister. Famous around the globe for its interesting and dynamite position, the Taktsang Monastery has become something of a legend in Bhutan, and across numerous pieces of Asia and around the globe where Buddhism dwells. Accepted to be the reflection spot of the Guru Rinpoche (Padmasambhava), who initially carried Buddhism to Bhutan, legend has it that he arrived on the mountain in the wake of flying on a goliath tigress accepted to be a partner known as Yeshe Tsogyal. In the wake of pondering in the 13 caverns on the edge for a very long time, a quarter of a year, three weeks, three days, and three hours, he arose in eight appearances and the spot turned out to be blessed. The religious community was worked around the collapses 1692 and has since become a social symbol of the Bhutanese public.

                              

05. Trinpung Dzong

A huge religious community and fortification of the Kagyu school of Buddhism in Bhutan, Rinpung Dzong is one of the most celebrated sanctuaries in Bhutan, and it houses the Monastic Body of Governance for the locale. One of Bhutan’s “provisional” locales in the incorporation records for future, the site of the dzong was given in the fifteenth century to the Buddhist Lamas, where a little sanctuary was manufactured. The sanctuary was given to the Zhabdrung Rinpoche in the seventeenth century, who annihilated the past structure and manufactured the dzong that actually remains there today. It was reconsecrated and turned into the religious and regulatory focus of western Bhutan in 1646, and the dzong likewise showed up in the 1993 film, Little Buddha.

                               

06. Chele La Pass

Considered to be the highest pass accessible by vehicle in Bhutan, at around 3,989 meters above sea level, Chele La Pass is one of the most popular high points to visit in Bhutan. Lying above the virgin forests of the Haa Valley in Paro District, the pass offers some stunning views of the waterfalls, forests, and alpine valleys surrounding it. Just over two hours from Paro, the road to the pass runs through thick forests and passes rivers and waterfalls with stunning scenery. Alongside the road heading up to the pass are hundreds of poles adorned with prayer flags that have been erected by the locals to scare off demons and evil spirits.

                                                                

07. Punakha Dzong

Also known as Pungtang Dewa chhenbi Phodrang, which translates into “the palace of happiness and bliss”, Punakha Dzong is a 17th-century monastery that was constructed by the first Bhutanese Zhabdrung Rinpoche, and it is the second oldest Buddhist dzong in the kingdom. Once the administrative seat of government in Bhutan until 1955, the dzong houses some of Bhutan’s most sacred relics of the Drukpa Lineage of the Kagyu School of Buddhism, as well as the sacred remains of the first Zhabdrung Rinpoche. The dzong was also the site of the wedding of King Jigme Khesar Namgyel Wangchuck and his bride, Jetsun Pema, in October 2011, which was the first national TV broadcast to the Bhutanese people.

                          

                   

08. Phobjikha Valley

Also known as the Gangteng Valley, Phobjikha Valley is a huge U-shaped glacial valley in central Bhutan, which is the home of the famous Gangteng Monastery. The valley is famous for the rare black-necked cranes that visit the area for the winter from their summer home in Tibet. As the cranes arrive in the last week of October, they circle around the Gangteng Monastery roof three times before landing in the valley’s wetlands and repeat this unique process as they leave for Tibet again in March. The reason the cranes do this is unknown, and Buddhists see it as an auspicious sign of good omen, and the whole area of the valley where the cranes roost for winter is protected. The best marshland in Bhutan, the valley is rich in diverse plant life and is home to more than ten other protected species of birds and animals. The three-day trek through the valley is popular, and hundreds of birdwatchers come to the area in October and March to witness the amazing spectacle of the cranes.

                         

09. Chomolhari

Also known as Jhomolhari, this huge mountain sits at 7,326 meters, yet is not the tallest mountain in Bhutan. Sitting astride the border between Tibet and Bhutan, the mountain is the source of the Paro River, which flows down the southern side of the mountain, and the Amo River, which flows down the north side. Known as the “bride of Kanchenjunga”, Bhutanese Buddhists believe it to be the home of one of the Five Tsheringma Sisters, the female protector goddesses of Bhutan and Tibet, who were bound by Padmasambhava to protect the people, the lands, and the Buddhist faith from evil demons. On the south side of the mountain, at 4,150 meters, lies the Chomolhari Temple, where religious pilgrims visiting the mountain stay, and just an hour’s walk up the mountain lies one of Bhutan’s highest lakes, the Tseringma Lhatso, or “spirit lake”